NEW STRATEGIES IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS

139 Pages | 24 Exhibits | 2001 Analysis Product Family: Market Reports




OVERVIEW:
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 90 million Americans live with some form of chronic disease, accounting for more than 60% of the nation's healthcare spending. With large expenses at stake, payers have recognized the need to focus on the cost-effective management of chronic cardiovascular disease.

Over the last decade, progress has been made in the introduction and implementation of cardiovascular disease management programs in terms of growing acceptance by healthcare companies, increases in the number of contracts with payers, and in the demonstration of tangible program benefits. The application of the Internet to these programs adds challenges and opportunities for each of the participants in the disease management process. For cardiovascular device and pharmaceutical manufacturers seeking opportunities to expand their market shares, Web-enabled cardiovascular disease management programs will prove an exciting new entry point to access cardiovascular disease physicians and patients.

This dynamic report from Medtech Insight provides clients with an in-depth analysis of the new era in cardiovascular disease management programs. Major topics include: clinical documentation tools for physicians; foundations for comorbidity disease management programs; goals, guidelines, and innovations in cardiovascular disease management programs; interactive voice response systems; medical device industry and wireless technology company alliances; patient enrollment and assessment; self-monitoring programs; web site focus in disease management; and wireless internet connectivity.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

i.   The Evolution of Disease Management Programs

ii.   Elements of Cardiovascular Disease Management Programs

iii.  Similarities and Differences in Cardiovascular Disease

     Management Programs

iv.  Cardiovascular Disease Management Programs and the Internet

v.  Tools That Facilitate Communication in Cardiovascular Disease

     Management

vi.  E-Healthcare Challenges and Opportunities in Cardiovascular

     Disease Management

 

1. THE EVOLUTION OF DISEASE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS

     1.1 Foundations of Disease Management Programs

     1.2 Features of Disease Management Programs

     1.3 Guidelines for Disease Management Programs

     1.4 Limitations of Past Disease Management Programs

     1.5 Innovations in Disease Management Programs

 

2. ELEMENTS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT

     PROGRAMS

     2.1 Goals for Cardiovascular Disease Management Programs

     2.2 Tools for Cardiovascular Disease Patients

          2.2.1 Disease Management Instructions for the Patient

          2.2.2 Patient Behavior Modification

     2.3 Patient Enrollment and Assessment

          2.3.1 Enrollment

          2.3.2 Assessment

                   2.3.2.1 Assessment Tools

     2.4 Screening, Monitoring, and Follow-Up

          2.4.1 Call Centers

          2.4.2 Interactive Voice Response Systems

          2.4.3 Telemonitoring Devices

                   2.4.3.1 Self-Assessment Devices

                   2.4.3.2 Single-Parameter Devices

                   2.4.3.3 Multi-Parameter Devices

                   2.4.3.4 Advancements in Device Technology

          2.4.4 Electronic Medical Records

 

3. SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS

     3.1 Disease Management Programs for Coronary Artery Disease

          3.1.1 Population Management-Based Programs

          3.1.2 Device-Based Programs

     3.2 Disease Management Programs for Congestive Heart Failure

          3.2.1 Variations in Programs

          3.2.2 Blended Programs

     3.3 Foundations for Comorbidity Disease Management Programs

          3.3.1 Combining Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

                  Management Programs

          3.3.2 Other Comorbidity Disease Management Programs

 

4. CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS AND THE INTERNET

     4.1 Web Site Focus in Disease Management

          4.1.1 Content- and Communication-Focused Companies

          4.1.2 Connectivity-Focused Companies

          4.1.3 Care-Focused Companies

     4.2 Self-Monitoring Programs

     4.3 Program Success Indicators

          4.3.1 Congestive Heart Failure Outcomes Studies

                   4.3.1.1 Call Center-Based Program Outcomes

                   4.3.1.2 Device-Based Program Outcomes

          4.3.2 Coronary Artery Disease Outcomes Studies

 

5. TOOLS THAT FACILITATE COMMUNICATION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT

     5.1 Clinical Documentation Tools for Physicians

     5.2 Wireless Versus Internet Connectivity

     5.3 Medical Industry and Wireless Technology Company Alliances

 

6. E-HEALTHCARE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT

     6.1 E-Healthcare Challenges for Cardiovascular Disease Management

          Programs

          6.1.1 Physician Implementation of Internet Disease Management

                  Programs

          6.1.2 Patient Accessibility and Self-Reliance

          6.1.3 Healthcare Organizations

     6.2 E-Healthcare Opportunities for Cardiovascular Disease

          Management Programs

          6.2.1 Cost Reductions and Improved Patient Outcomes

          6.2.2 Direct-Payer Alliances

          6.2.3 Alliances with Device Manufacturers

 

7. COMPANY PROFILES

 7.1   Agilent Technologies, Inc.

 7.2   Alere Medical, Inc.

 7.3   American Healthways, Inc.

 7.4   CorSolutions Medical, Inc.

 7.5   Cyber-Care, Inc.

 7.6   Data Critical Corporation

 7.7   Health Hero Network, Inc.

 7.8   HomMed, LLC

 7.9   I-trax, Inc.

 7.10  LifeMasters Supported SelfCare, Inc.

 7.11  ProMedex, Inc./Landacorp, Inc.

 7.12  QMed, Inc.

 

COMPANY LISTING

LIST OF EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit ES-1:  The Disease Management Process 

Exhibit ES-2:  Types of Patient Monitoring Processes Offered by Leading Disease Management Companies 

 

Exhibit 1-1:    The Disease Management Process 

Exhibit 1-2:    Parameters for Disease Management Program Success, Congestive Heart Failure 

Exhibit 1-3:    Technology-Based Applications Available for Disease Management Program Integration 

Exhibit 1-4:    Technological Advancements and the Disease Management Process 

 

Exhibit 2-1:    Internet Use in Disease Management Patient Education Programs 

Exhibit 2-2:    Heart Disease Risk in 55-Year-Old Adults According to Levels of Various Risk Factors, Framingham Heart Study 

Exhibit 2-3:    2000, American Healthways, Members with Internet Access 

Exhibit 2-4:    Cardiac Disease Management Programs, Interface Between Telemonitoring Devices and Call Center Resources 

Exhibit 2-5:    Congestive Heart Failure Disease Management Programs, Parameters Measured by Telemonitoring Devices 

 

Exhibit 3-1:    Comorbidity Management Programs Offered by Selected Cardiovascular Disease Management Companies 

 

Exhibit 4-1:    Areas of Web Site Focus in E-Healthcare 

Exhibit 4-2:    Types of Cardiovascular Disease Management Companies and Their Areas of Web Site Focus 

Exhibit 4-3:    Differences Between Internet-Enabled Self-Monitoring Disease Management Programs and Clinician-Managed Programs 

Exhibit 4-4:    Reduction in Hospital Admissions in Selected Disease Management Company Studies 

Exhibit 4-5:    Clinical Outcomes Parameters Used in Coronary Artery Disease Population Studies 

 

Exhibit 5-1:    The Potential Impact of Wireless Technology Solutions for Physicians on the Disease Management Process 

Exhibit 5-2:    Interfaces and Alliance Opportunities Afforded by Wireless Internet Technology 

 

Exhibit 6-1:    Challenges and Solutions Associated with Physician Implementation of Internet Disease Management Programs 

Exhibit 6-2:    Challenges and Solutions Associated with Patient Accessibility to Internet Disease Management Programs 

Exhibit 6-3:    Challenges and Solutions Associated with Health Plan Acceptance of Internet Disease Management Programs 

Exhibit 6-4:    Benefits of Application Service Providers Versus Full Service in Direct-Payer Relationships with Disease Management Companies 

Exhibit 6-5:    Potential Alliance Opportunities between Internet-Enabled Cardiovascular Disease Management Companies and Medical Device/Technology Companies 



COMPANIES COVERED:

  1. Agilent Technologies, Inc.
  2. Alere Medical, Inc.
  3. American Healthways, Inc.
  4. CorSolutions Medical, Inc.
  5. Cyber-Care, Inc.
  6. Data Critical Corporation
  7. Health Hero Network, Inc.
  8. HomMed, LLC
  9. I-trax, Inc.
  10. LifeMasters Supported SelfCare, Inc.
  11. ProMedex, Inc./Landacorp, Inc.
  12. QMed, Inc.
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